Author Topic: Neutering  (Read 4902 times)

Offline Bunter

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Neutering
« on: October 26, 2010, 09:41:02 AM »
There is much to be said, but for now I will just say that male dogs can still remain fertile after castration for a period of time.

I'm having difficulty finding a reliable source for the information, but it seems the sperm can still live for a week after castration and a dog can still sire pups for anything from one month to 90 days after castration  :shrug:  Like I said - lack of creditable source for a definitive answer.

Offline Bunter

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Re: Neutering
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2010, 12:48:43 PM »
This is an abstract from The Veterinary Journal from this year:
If neutering is practised, there is choice over when the procedure is undertaken. Early neutering (neutering before first oestrus: under approximately 6 months of age) has distinct advantages.  When undertaken at 7 weeks of age, there is more rapid recovery from anaesthetics, and fewer postoperative complications than when conducted at 7 months of age (Howe, 1997). When compared with entire females, the risk of mammary neoplasia is reduced to 0.05% if neutering is undertaken before the first oestrus, 8% when performed between the first and second oestrus, and 26% when conducted after the second oestrus (Schneider et al., 1969).  Small reductions in the risk of obesity and some adverse behavioural traits in females neutered early have also been reported (Spain et al., 2004). Early neutering also increases the number of neutered animals in dog homes (shelters), therefore increasing the number of animals that are adopted and reducing the number that need to be euthanased (Lieberman, 1987). Moreover, there is the demographic benefit of removing the potential for breeding in animals adopted from dog homes.

Offline Bunter

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Re: Neutering
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2011, 12:54:09 PM »
EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO NEUTER SURGERY AND INTRODUCTION TO EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICAL PRACTICE

This is a very interesting and fully scientific study of neutering in dogs and cats, including early neutering (7-12 weeks of age).

Several very good studies have been pulled together and the results are reproduced in this article.  The benefits and risks are discussed in full, with no political axe to grind.