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Author Topic: The use of crates and crate training  (Read 1701 times)

Offline Bunter

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The use of crates and crate training
« on: February 08, 2010, 22:41:48 PM »
Crates can be very useful to help with housetraining, save your home from being chewed and to keep your dog safe. They can also be used to transport dogs in cars or vans safely.

You and your dog must never see or use the crate as a place of punishment. Your dog should see it as his den and place of safety - a place to chill out and take a nap. The crate needs to be big enough for your dog to stand upright and move around in.

As dogs don’t tend to use their sleeping quarters as a toilet, it can help in house training if your dog sleeps in a crate overnight. Puppies and young dogs may not be able to go all night without going to the toilet, so arrangements will need to be made until they are old enough to go through the night.

A crate can also be a place to pop your dog in if you need to leave him unattended for a short while – I wouldn’t like to leave a dog in a crate for more than about a couple of hours on a regular basis, other than overnight. Crating your dog can keep your house safe from being chewed in the early days, separate two or more dogs if you are unsure of their temperament with each other and the same with dogs and cats. It shouldn’t be used to leave your dog in for hours. He’ll get stressed, bored and may develop behavioural issues due to this.

Your dog may also choose to go in his crate to get away from something he finds a bit stressful – a children’s party for instance. You may want to take his crate with you if you are visiting someone and you think your dog will feel stressed by the visit. His crate will help to make him feel safe.

Unless your dog has already been crate trained, you cannot expect him to just walk in there and be happy. He needs to be shown that it is a nice place. You may want to feed him in there or give him chews, etc in there. Try dropping a few titbits in there now and again for him to find. Pop him in there for a few minutes at a time to start with, with a treat and then let him out again. Make it his only bed and ensure it is warm and comfy for him. He must always feel safe in there, so ensure that he’s not disturbed. Call him out of his crate if you need him.

My foster dogs have got to know it was time for bed by the nightly routine. Often they have just taken themselves off to their crates of their own accord when I start the routine. As this includes getting treats for them to put in their crate, I guess that helps! I also use a gentle command of bedtime now.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 21:02:23 PM by emilyjw »

Offline Bunter

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Re: The use of crates and crate training
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2010, 11:38:59 AM »
CRATE TRAINING YOUR PUPPY/DOG  Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT)